Collaboration with Carrie Knowles : “The Inevitable Past”

Carrie is a dear friend and a VERY talented writer and artist! I was really honored that she asked me to collaborate with her on creating a large-scale piece of artwork. This particular piece will be presented at a special exhibition at the Brisbane Institute of Art in Brisbane, Australia, November 11th – 24th.

That means I’ll have my work internationally viewed!! Ha!!

The exhibition pairs her writing with our visual art piece. I would never be able to do justice in describing her story, and recommend you read her synopsis of the story and the accompanying art in her own well-written words.  🙂

To summarize, the piece is to represent the DNA double helix, drifting as if in a breeze. The piece is a continuous 6.4 meter-long (~7 yards) piece of linen, that we worked on in my home studio. Dyeing a piece that large meant getting really creative in utilizing the limited space in my studio. We wound up dyeing 7-foot portions of the linen (the size of my work table), and then shifting the entire fabric over. It took several passes, and 2 days!

We first put soy wax down to represent a double helix image. I have never done batik on linen, and it was a fun experience, since it absorbs wax very differently than silk! Same thing goes for the hand brushed dye that we subsequently applied in shades of red, orange, and yellow.

I rolled the fabric up at the end of each day, and let it “steep” in its dampness. Working with linen meant I needed to use soda ash to activate the fiber-reactive dye, and keep it damp for 12-24 hours. It fortunately requires that I don’t steam it. Apparently, the steam would be bad for the linen. When I dye silk, I don’t use soda ash to activate the dye… as I found out in 2012, before my first fashion show ever, when the soda ash pretty much ATE some of my fabric; so as I took the fabric out of the washer, it literally fell apart in my hands!!!! Instead now, I steam the silk fabric to activate and set the fiber-reactive dye.  It works fabulously, and also removes most of the wax in the process!  Double awesome!

Well, I was super happy with the results of working with linen.  It has such a fantastic, heavy, earthy, but soft hand, and of course the soy wax left no stiff residue!!

If you happen to be in Brisbane, swing by the Brisbane Institute of Arts, and check out this exhibit!! Oh, and send me photos!!

P.S. Carrie has a new book, A Garden Wall in Provence. I certainly recommend reading this!

Work in progress shots…

The whole piece!CarrieKnowles_FullWidth

Close-up of the embroidered pieces…CarrieKnowles_7

Fabulous Redress Runway photos!

Truly spectacular photos by reDirect Photography, plus here is his summary blog post of the Redress Raleigh show!

Hairologist: Demetra of D-Spot 
Makeup: Makeup Artistry by Amani
Models’ sites:
Colleen Ann Guest
Camellia Jade
Vivian Powers-Ramge

Photos from backstage, Redress Raleigh 2015

Just the start of the many amazing photos taken by fabulous photographers….

These beautiful photos were taken by the very creative, very talented Ernesto Sue.
This was outside the Lincoln Theatre, before the Redress Raleigh Fashion Show began.
Hairologist: Demetra of D-Spot 
Makeup: Makeup Artistry by Amani
Models’ sites:
Colleen Ann Guest
Camellia Jade
Vivian Powers-Ramge

 

Come learn from me! It’ll be fun!!!

Just a reminder!!
Register asap!

March 21-22:  Batik 2-day workshop at Pullen Arts Center
Learn Batik from me in this 2-day workshop.
Loads of fun in a creative environment.  No experience necessary.
I will provide all the materials so you can make two 8″x54″ silk scarves of your very own!!
Three ways to register: 
http://www.raleighnc.gov/content/extra/Books/PRecRecreation/PreviousLeisureLedger/#3Find the listing on page 23 of the Leisure Ledger for details:
http://www.raleighnc.gov/content/extra/Books/PRecRecreation/PreviousLeisureLedger/#23

March 28:  Shibori workshop at Gather in Cary
Join me to learn Shibori techniques in this super fun, hands-on class!!!
Shibori is a Japanese technique of binding, stitching, and clamping fabric to create pattern when dye is applied. Loosely, you could call it “Japanese Tie-dye”.
Register here:
http://www.gathernc.com/web/?product=shibori-dyeingsaturday-march-28th1030-130pm

Tiki42014-11-13-14.06.11

Learn Batik and Shibori from me!!!

I’m teaching two SUPER FUN workshops this month!!!**
Register asap!

March 21-22:  Batik 2-day workshop at Pullen Arts Center
Learn Batik from me in this 2-day workshop.
Loads of fun in a creative environment.  No experience necessary.
I will provide all the materials so you can make two 8″x54″ silk scarves of your very own!!
Find the listing on page 23 of the Leisure Ledger for details:
http://www.raleighnc.gov/content/extra/Books/PRecRecreation/PreviousLeisureLedger/#23

March 28:  Shibori workshop at Gather in Cary
Join me to learn Shibori techniques in this super fun, hands-on class!!!
Shibori is a Japanese technique of binding, stitching, and clamping fabric to create pattern when dye is applied. Loosely, you could call it “Japanese Tie-dye”.
Register here:
http://www.gathernc.com/web/?product=shibori-dyeingsaturday-march-28th1030-130pm

Link to Leopold ETSY page (2)

** (if I may say so, myself… but, ask those who’ve taken my classes… they’ll agree!!) 

New Intro to Batik classes added!! Sign up now!!

YAY!!!  I’ve successfully taught two “Intro to Batik” classes at Ornamentea in downtown Raleigh, and everyone has had a great time!!!  Including me!  It’s so much fun to see what people create!!

You can go to the Ornamentea.com/Classes site online.  Just scroll down to the Batik Basics portion.

But for your convenience, I’ve added the direct links to each class date below!
Here are the dates…
Tuesday, July 15, 5:30-8:30

Sunday, August 10, 12:30-3:30

Tuesday, August 26, 5:30-8:30

class image

Video interview of me!

Carl Tyer of Sound Images produced this cool slideshow video interview of me.  In it I discuss my background and my inspiration for this year’s line of clothing for the Redress Raleigh Eco-Fashion Show.
http://vimeo.com/98453136

Additional photography by Elizabeth Galecke Photography.